Damned slow insurance, grrr

Last Saturday, almost a full week ago, my Google Nexus 7 touchscreen was broken in three pieces. I was able to back it up without resigning myself to a few-weeks-old backup and appealed to the insurance I did on purchase.

After giving them all information they asked for in the contract, they contact me two whole days afterwards demanding pictures and full details of the accident in order to open the process. Wait, what? If they needed that, couldn’t they put it in the contract text? Really? Was it so hard?

Ok, I send them that. Two more days pass without a reply. This is unacceptable and I wrote them in protest.

Not one hour had passed, and they came back to me with a case number and that the process had been accepted.

So now I go back to the shop and… it has to be sent to the brand (Google/Asus) in order to see how hard/expensive it is to repair and then in at most 90 days (good grief) I will get either a repaired Nexus or a new one.

Now… this is seriously hurting my workflow, I was already fully addicted to being able to do ANSOL work in almost any place, being up to date with current events, socialize and so forth.

This is really frustrating.

Identi.ca Updates for 2013-05-15

  • @Evan installed pump.io via npm but I can’t figure how to launch it… #
  • @ovigia isso de fixação de salários é muito ditatorial. Quase parece uma ditadura da europa de leste… #
  • RT @lxoliva ♻ @panaggio: Dream that will never come true: @google announcing on @googleio less (no more?) blobs on Android’s code base. … #
  • @ovigia e? Essa coisa do nivelar por baixo não me soa nada bem. Parece mais coisa das ditaduras da europa de leste. #

Identi.ca Updates for 2013-05-14

  • RT @arnebab #Phoronix conclusions distort their results, shown with !GCC vs. #LLVM/Clang On AMD’s FX-8350 Vishera → draketo.de/node/563 … #
  • cc #pl118 ♻ @glynmoody Copyright in France: Wishful Thinking and Real Dangers – http://bit.ly/YSNvca more crazy Net stuff from #france #

My first #Drupal related patch

I’ve recently installed the Corporate Clean theme on ANSOL’s website because of it’s fluid design and top slides.

However, the slides are implemented directly in php code in the page.tpl.php file. I hated that. So I pushed my hate towards a positive result: a fix proposal.

So now you just put some PHP block on the Slideshow region, add a custom field to the pages you want to show up there and use the Summary for the content. Seems simple enough and it’s possible to change the slides without needing direct access to the code, so you can let less experienced people just post content.

French Report Says: Kill Hadopi, But Let Its Legacy Live On

Article note: What all general news outlets don’t tell you is that only the Hadopi *agency* is being proposed to close down.

The bad laws, of course, are to be maintained.

When Francois Hollande was running for President of France, he said that he would repeal Hadopi, the three strikes law and agency that enforces it, rolling back this effort which the entertainment industry had celebrated (France was the first to propose and implement such a plan). After elected, his culture minister, Aurelie Filippetti made it clear that she was not impressed by Hadopi and ordered a study of the effectiveness of the effort, led by Pierre Lescure — a former entertainment industry executive — to look at possible proposals. His report came out Monday morning and it suggests killing off Hadopi, but is still chock full of other bad ideas. Hadopi the agency would be done away with, but another agency would pick up some of the responsibilities, it’s just that they’d greatly decrease the “punishment” aspect. Rather than losing internet access and having to pay up to €1,500, you’d keep your access and fines would be topped at €60.

But, on top of that, there are other policies that Lescure suggests that seem pretty bad as well, including extending the copyright levy (the “you must be a criminal tax”) to cover smartphones, tablets and any other connected device. He also suggested turning search engines and ad networks into copyright cops, asking them to cut off those deemed to be involved in large scale infringement. We’ve discussed in the past why this is an idea that won’t work and will likely stifle innovation while locking in some of the more dominant players (like Google), but governments do seem to like it.

The report does have a few good things to it: including getting publishers to finally release their content as ebooks, allowing more non-commercial remixing and such. In the end, it’s a mixed bag, or as the French publication Le Point noted: l’Hadopi est morte, vive L’Hadopi (Hadopi is dead, long live Hadopi).

Of course, this is also just a report, with no binding aspect to it. The government may choose to ignore the whole thing or to pick and choose some parts to implement. Either way, it does make the key point that, for all the money the French taxpayers have put towards Hadopi, it’s been a near total waste: “While illicit file sharing has dropped, legal paid services have not benefited as was hoped.” It all goes back to the same point we’ve argued for years. The industry keeps thinking their goal is to get rid of piracy, when we’ve been saying that the real goal is to figure out ways to make more revenue. They — incorrectly — seem to feel that the first leads to the second, even as there is almost no proof to support that conjecture in the long term.

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French Report Says: Kill Hadopi, But Let Its Legacy Live On

Article note: What all general news outlets don’t tell you is that only the Hadopi *agency* is being proposed to close down.

The bad laws, of course, are to be maintained.

When Francois Hollande was running for President of France, he said that he would repeal Hadopi, the three strikes law and agency that enforces it, rolling back this effort which the entertainment industry had celebrated (France was the first to propose and implement such a plan). After elected, his culture minister, Aurelie Filippetti made it clear that she was not impressed by Hadopi and ordered a study of the effectiveness of the effort, led by Pierre Lescure — a former entertainment industry executive — to look at possible proposals. His report came out Monday morning and it suggests killing off Hadopi, but is still chock full of other bad ideas. Hadopi the agency would be done away with, but another agency would pick up some of the responsibilities, it’s just that they’d greatly decrease the “punishment” aspect. Rather than losing internet access and having to pay up to €1,500, you’d keep your access and fines would be topped at €60.

But, on top of that, there are other policies that Lescure suggests that seem pretty bad as well, including extending the copyright levy (the “you must be a criminal tax”) to cover smartphones, tablets and any other connected device. He also suggested turning search engines and ad networks into copyright cops, asking them to cut off those deemed to be involved in large scale infringement. We’ve discussed in the past why this is an idea that won’t work and will likely stifle innovation while locking in some of the more dominant players (like Google), but governments do seem to like it.

The report does have a few good things to it: including getting publishers to finally release their content as ebooks, allowing more non-commercial remixing and such. In the end, it’s a mixed bag, or as the French publication Le Point noted: l’Hadopi est morte, vive L’Hadopi (Hadopi is dead, long live Hadopi).

Of course, this is also just a report, with no binding aspect to it. The government may choose to ignore the whole thing or to pick and choose some parts to implement. Either way, it does make the key point that, for all the money the French taxpayers have put towards Hadopi, it’s been a near total waste: “While illicit file sharing has dropped, legal paid services have not benefited as was hoped.” It all goes back to the same point we’ve argued for years. The industry keeps thinking their goal is to get rid of piracy, when we’ve been saying that the real goal is to figure out ways to make more revenue. They — incorrectly — seem to feel that the first leads to the second, even as there is almost no proof to support that conjecture in the long term.

Permalink | Comments | Email This Story